Prime Matchmaking In Competitive Gaming

This should be a thing.

Almost every person who has played an online game, especially competitively, has probably heard the stories of hackers and smurf accounts. One of the games that I have the most experience with these issues is in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. I’m an avid player of the game, and I spend a lot of time playing its competitive game mode, in which I’ve encountered multiple hackers that have cause my experience to be not as fun.

Here is an example from my YouTube channel:

It looks frustrating doesn’t it?

Now, what happens when these hackers get their accounts permanently banned?

They make a new one.

Prime matchmaking is a way to keep these new accounts, made by hackers, from being able to queue for competitive matchmaking again. How? Prime matchmaking requires a phone number, and when your account gets banned, so will your phone number. You must be thinking “hey, what if they use a voip number, or a family members phone number?” Well, they could do that. And if they hack again, they will get that phone number banned as well. Yeah, it’s a slightly messy fix, but it’s still better than no fix.

How does the banning of phone-number-bound accounts help the competitive scene? You can only bind your phone number to one account, which causes that account to be considered “Prime”. Prime accounts can only queue with other prime accounts, and play in prime matches. The more hackers that get banned, the less you will see.

This works for smurf accounts because they can only make one account prime, as said earlier. They have to choose between their account that is ranked low (not actually their rank), or their main account. If they play their main account more often, then they might choose to make that one prime, and they will only be able to play with people their current rank in matches.

What are some other benefits of prime matchmaking. I’ll give you some examples from my personal experience. I feel like people who make an account prime, and use that account, knowing they will get banned if they do anything bad, are generally the more serious players of the game. They tend to use voice communication more often, grief less often, and are less toxic in general. I noticed a vast amount of difference in the non-prime and prime games that I played. There was still that chance I would run into hackers, or griefers in a prime match, but I knew that if their account got banned, I would probably never play with them again.

The biggest benefit of prime, is that as more accounts get banned, the less likely you are to play with hackers and griefers, because they will most likely never be able to queue for prime matchmaking again. More and more will get banned, and the matches will become more and more clean over time as the system does what it does best.

That is why I believe more games with competitive scenes should incorporate this system.

All feedback is welcome.

CS:GO – Adventures As A Silver #01

Hello Everyone!

So, I thought I would start writing about my experiences as a fairly new player in CS:GO. The game is extremely fun, very well made, and also a bit on the frustrating side. When I first started, I hadn’t looked into the elo rating system, and I didn’t really think of it much on the competitive side. I didn’t know much about the game, and was new to the franchise. I started out with casual games, and enjoyed them. That is until I queued for a competitive game for the first time.

My team was amazing. They were doing all of these call-outs that I had yet to learn, and they seemed so organized. Three games in, and I was addicted. After that, I lost a few, but pressed forward. I got my first rank (Silver I) and had a beer to celebrate. Later, I learned that this was just the beginning of my journey. I played many games, winning and losing, trying to figure out how to get better. A friend introduced me to the streamers of CS:GO and I started learning more stuff about the game. I started watching YouTube videos to learn the call-outs and grenade tosses. Pretty soon I was quite educated on the maps.

I soon learned the term smurf, and since then, have realized the effect it has on the competitive part of the game. I had trouble ranking up past silver I. I would get on a winning spree, and then suddenly play a few games where the opposing teams top-fragger had double the kills of the rest of their team. People were yelling “smurf! they’re a smurf!” and I wasn’t sure what to think about them, but I started to get annoyed with these smurfs.

Soon, I played with a clan that I had made friends with, and I ranked up three times in one week. I went from silver I to silver 4 in a heartbeat. We were on a roll, until the game with smurfs. We were still trying to get better at this game, but suddenly we were getting our asses handed to us in what was supposed to be a silver game. I then decided to check the profiles of these over-achievers, and realized there was a pattern. The only game they owned was CS:GO. These people were already good at the game, but they were going back to destroy new silvers.

Maybe it’s a learning experience. Maybe it is a challenge to help me get better at the game, but altogether it is a frustrating experience that makes match-making feel broken. I enjoy a challenge, but I should be able to decide for myself if I want one. Not have it forced on me. The broken match-making (smurfing) has given me the feeling of wanting to quit the game more than once now. My fellow clan-mates feel the same way. Do we queue up and hope to get lucky, that we are not playing a Gold Nova… Master Guardian… someone that found the game on sale for 5$ and made a new account out of curiosity, because they wanted to feel bad-ass, or maybe wanting to play with friends?

I’m not sure if there is any way around this, but here is one thing I have to say… CS:GO has no reason to go on sale… It has a high player-base, and there is no reason for people to own more than one copy of the game. Stop putting your damn game on sale, and give new players a chance. I was silver 4, and down-ranked playing against a smurf team. They just laugh and call me salty, when the only game they own is CS:GO with barely any hours. Yeah, you’re better than me. Maybe I am salty… but because you’re better than me, you shouldn’t be playing against me.

I’m addicted to the game. I want to get as good as the higher ranks, so that smurfs won’t exist to me anymore. It’s going to be a rough ride, but I’ll have to deal with it, because there still aren’t any competitive fps games quite as good as CS:GO.

Until next time,

GAME HARD

Video: AWP Compilation #1 (CS:GO)

Hello Everyone!

Check out my first ever Awp Compilation!


I’ve decided to make a compilation of some of my best awp shots. I’ve been trying to practice with the awp a lot, and am enjoying learning how to be a proper awper. It’s one of my favorite weapons so far.

I’m going to be putting out more compilations of cool, funny, and interesting kills in CS:GO, as I’ve been playing a lot of it lately.

Until next time,

GAME HARD!

Spotlight: Reflex | Arena FPS Done Right

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Hello everyone!

This week I’m going to have to give the spotlight to Reflex! Reflex is a competitive Arena FPS. The game is still in the prototype stage, but the gameplay is actually pretty awesome. It feels really good to jump around and shoot the weapons that are currently in game. You can even ramp jump – whoohoo! They plan to update the game regularly, and I’m sure it’s going to end up being a pretty amazing arena shooter!

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What I really want to talk about is the map creation tool that comes packaged with the game. It’s like hidden gold. The editor is simple and fun, and is almost like a game within itself. You can edit the maps in real time with click-and-drag mechanics. A total newbie to level editing could enjoy these tools. Oh wait, that’s me. I’ve never made a map for a game before… well maybe a few times in RPG maker, but that doesn’t really count, right? I was able to look up a few commands on their forums, and sit down and make an actual playable level. I got so sucked in, that I spent almost 6 hours just playing with the tools. Here is the coolest part… the level editing tools are multiplayer! Yep, you heard me right! You can edit you map in real time, with other people, and they can even be in play mode and shooting each other while you are building your level. That is the gold, right there!

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I recently had set my map to public, and when I logged on today to get some screenshots for everyone, I got photobombed by a random visitor. They were jumping around my map as I was adding in a new pathway. This is an experience I can say I have never had before. Don’t you dare start whispering “Minecraft” at me, because your blocks are inferior to my brushes! ;D muehehe *cough* Just kidding… Minecraft will always have its charms.

Anyways, I believe the editor deserves some time in the spotlight, especially since it will only get better from where it is currently at. You can render lighting and watch it build itself in real time, you can switch from edit to play mode within seconds, and you can easily have a whole team of friends or strangers helping you work on your map, while being able to watch every move they make. If you’re curious, grab yourself a copy of Reflex on Steam!

TechKS

HostileKS

FriendlyKS

Until next time – GAME HARD